Satish Gujral, legendry artist, painter, passes away

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PRIME Minister Narendra Modi has condoled the demise of renowned artist and architect Satish Gujral. He is survived by wife Kiran, son Mohit, daughter-in-law Feroze and grandchildren. He was acclaimed for his versatility across different mediums He was 94 when he breathed his last in Delhi on March 26. “He had been unwell for quite some time, Ranjit Haskote, curator and artist told PTI.Gujral, was younger brother of Indra Kumar Gujral, Prime Minister of India between 1997 and 1998.He was awarded the Padma Vibhushan in recognition as   architect, painter, muralist, sculptor and graphic artist. His familiar works include the alphabet mural on the outside wall of the Delhi High Court. He also designed the Belgian Embassy in Delhi. Gujral’s artworks were heavily inspired by the turbulence of his early years, including the illness that impaired his hearing as a child and the Partition of the subcontinent. Unlike many of his peers, who went to Paris or London in the early 1950s, Gujral went to Mexico City to study with Diego Rivera and Siqueiros. Gujral’s was a versatile practice spanning painting, sculpture and architecture. RIP, Hosote tweeted, expressing his condolences. Recalling his determination that helped him overcome adversity PM Modi says “Satish Gujral Ji was versatile and multifaceted. He was admired for his creativity as well as the determination with which he overcame adversity.” Gujral’s intellectual thirst took him far and wide, yet he remained attached to his roots. “Saddened by his demise. Om Shanti,” the prime minister added. Hoskote. “He had been unwell for quite some time, the curator and artist told PTI. Gujral is survived by wife Kiran, son Mohit, daughter-in-law Feroze and grandchildren. Gujral, who was awarded the Padma Vibhushan, was an architect, painter, muralist, sculptor and graphic artist. His familiar works include the alphabet mural on the outside wall of the Delhi High Court. He also designed the Belgian Embassy in Delhi. Gujral’s artworks were heavily inspired by the turbulence of his early years, including the illness that impaired his hearing as a child and the Partition of the subcontinent. Unlike many of his peers, who went to Paris or London in the early 1950s, Gujral went to Mexico City to study with Diego Rivera and Siqueiros. Gujral’s was a versatile practice spanning painting, sculpture and architecture. RIP, Hosote tweeted, expressing his condolences. Citizens of Delhi had honoured Gujral as one of its 25 citizens who in the last 50 years, brought the city on the world map. Dozens of documentaries have been made recording his work. A full feature film on his life is in the making. Four books of his work have been published including an autobiography. His work shown in this collection reflects the spirit of traditional Indian Miniatures and Temple Sculptures. (edited by PKC)

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